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Bird Image Greater White-fronted Goose
Anser albifrons
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Greater White-fronted Geese nest on marshy ponds in the tundra or taiga. They winter in open country in mild climates in habitat with shallow fresh or salt water near agricultural fields. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Snow Goose
Chen caerulescens
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Snow Geese nest colonially in the Arctic tundra within five miles of the coast. Greater Snow Geese tend to nest in higher, drier areas than Lesser Snow Geese. During migration and in winter, they inhabit coastal and freshwater marshes, estuaries, and agricultural lands, with Greater Snow Geese more likely to be in saltwater habitats than Lessers. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Brant
Branta bernicla
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Brant are almost exclusively coastal in their range and are found in shallow bays and saltwater marshes. They nest in the wet, coastal tundra of the high Arctic. Their winter habitat is closely tied to the occurrence of sea grasses and marine algae. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Cackling Goose
Branta hutchinsii
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On their tundra breeding grounds, Cackling Geese are always found near water. In winter and during migration they are found on inland lakes, rivers and marshes; in coastal salt marshes, bays and tidal flats; in brackish ponds, pastures and agricultural fields, and in grassy fields in urban and suburban parks with close proximity to water. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Canada Goose
Branta canadensis
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The Canada Goose is the most widely distributed goose in North America. Canada Geese breed in northern temperate, sub-arctic and arctic regions and nest in Canada, Alaska, and all of the lower 48 states. They are found at a broad range of elevations, from coastal through alpine, and occupy a broad range of habitats, as long as there is water nearby. They are found in ponds, lakes, reservoirs, bays, estuaries, marshes, pastures and fields, city and suburban parks, golf courses, and grassy waterfront yards. Canada Geese prefer riverine areas for breeding, but will nest in a wide variety of wetland habitats. During winter and migration, Canada Geese are commonly seen in agricultural areas, foraging on grain, winter wheat, and pasture grasses. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Trumpeter Swan
Cygnus buccinator
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Trumpeter Swans inhabit lakes, ponds, large rivers, and coastal bays. They were historically more common in fresh water than salt water, but this is no longer the case. Their most important habitat requirements are open water, access to food, and protection from disturbance. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Gadwall
Anas strepera
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Ponds and marshes are the preferred habitat of the Gadwall, which is often found in deeper water than many other dabblers. In western Washington, it is associated with developed and cleared areas and, on Puget Sound, shows a preference for urbanized habitats over less developed areas. Gadwalls are often found at sewage ponds. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Eurasian Wigeon
Anas penelope
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Eurasian Wigeons inhabit marshes, lakes, bays, and fields. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image American Wigeon
Anas americana
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In the summer, large inland marshes are the preferred habitat of the American Wigeon. During migration and in winter they frequent a variety of freshwater and saltwater wetlands. They are commonly found grazing on land, but also spend more time than other dabbling ducks in deep water. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Mallard
Anas platyrhynchos
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Shallow marshes are the preferred habitat, although Mallards are found virtually everywhere there is open water, from city parks to subalpine lakes. Although they favor fresh water, they are also often found in sheltered bays and estuaries along the coast. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Cinnamon Teal
Anas cyanoptera
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Cinnamon Teal are found in small, shallow, freshwater wetlands with emergent vegetation. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Northern Shoveler
Anas clypeata
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Northern Shovelers inhabit shallow, marshy ponds and wetlands at low elevations. Breeding habitat is in open country (prairie or tundra), or lowland woodlands and clearings, always near shallow water. During winter and migration they will use virtually any wetland as long as it has muddy edges. Shovelers will forage in sewage ponds and stagnant or polluted waters avoided by other species of ducks. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Northern Pintail
Anas acuta
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During the breeding season, Northern Pintails use shallow ponds and marshes in open areas. In winter they can be found around shallow wetlands, exposed mudflats, flooded fields, or lakes. During migration, they have been seen in offshore waters. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Green-winged Teal
Anas crecca
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The Green-winged Teal lives in shallow wetlands, preferring fresh water for breeding, but is resident on both fresh and salt water at other times of the year. Nesting habitat usually has trees and shrubs. During winter and migration, wetlands with a lot of emergent and floating vegetation are commonly used. Tidal mudflats are used by this species more often than by any other duck. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Canvasback
Aythya valisineria
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Canvasbacks breed in shallow prairie lakes and ponds with marshy shorelines, especially those with bulrush. They typically inhabit large lakes during migration. In winter they frequent sheltered lakes, saltwater bays, and estuaries. They also use sewage lagoons. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Redhead
Aythya americana
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Redheads nest on marshy freshwater lakes, ponds, slow moving rivers and other wetlands in prairie zones. During migration they gather on large lakes and they spend the winter on sheltered saltwater bays and estuaries and some inland lakes. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Ring-necked Duck
Aythya collaris
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Ring-necked Ducks nest in small, wooded ponds in boreal forests and some prairie regions. In migration and during winter, they inhabit ponds, lakes, slow-moving rivers, and occasionally coastal estuaries, but generally do not inhabit saltwater bays. Shallow, freshwater marshes with dense stands of submergent and emergent vegetation are preferred in all seasons. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Greater Scaup
Aythya marila
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The Greater Scaup is the more northerly of the two species of North American Scaup. In the summer, they breed on marshy, lowland tundra at the northern limits of the boreal forest. In winter, they gather in coastal bays, lagoons, and estuaries, with some wintering on inland lakes. While the Greater Scaup does overlap with the Lesser Scaup in winter, it tends to frequent more open, exposed areas. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Lesser Scaup
Aythya affinis
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In winter, Lesser Scaups are often found in dense flocks of hundreds and even thousands, on lakes, reservoirs, rivers, and sheltered bays. Lesser Scaup are far more likely than Greater Scaup to be found on fresh water inland during the winter. In summer, nesting habitat is small wetlands with emergent vegetation in boreal forests and parklands. During migration, Lesser Scaups spend their time on rivers, lakes, and large wetlands. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image King Eider
Somateria spectabilis
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Bird Image Harlequin Duck
Histrionicus histrionicus
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Harlequin Ducks prefer turbulent water, both in their breeding habitat, which is along fast-moving mountain streams, and in their wintering habitat, which is along rocky coastlines. The mountain streams are usually at low to subalpine elevations within a closed forest canopy, and have midstream gravel bars or rocks for roosting. Coastal habitat is typically in the shallow, intertidal zones along rocky coastlines, where rough surf is the norm. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Surf Scoter
Melanitta perspicillata
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Surf Scoters nest on freshwater lakes and wetlands in the Arctic, in sparsely forested and semi-open regions. They winter in open coastal environments, favoring shallow bays and estuaries with rocky substrates. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image White-winged Scoter
Melanitta fusca
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White-winged Scoters nest on freshwater lakes and wetlands in open country in the northwest interior of North America. They winter in open, coastal environments, favoring bays and inlets with sandy shores and shellfish beds. White-winged Scoters are generally found in deeper water and farther from shore than the other scoters. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Black Scoter
Melanitta nigra
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The breeding range of the Black Scoter is at the edge of the northern forest or in the treeless tundra, where they breed on small, shallow lakes, ponds, sloughs, and river banks with tall grasses to conceal nests. In winter, they can be found on coastal bays and along coastlines, usually in shallow water within a mile of shore. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Long-tailed Duck
Clangula hyemalis
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Long-tailed Ducks breed in shallow tundra ponds and lakes. During other seasons, Long-tailed Ducks can be found on the ocean over sandy substrates. They prefer sheltered water, but can be found on the open ocean as well. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Bufflehead
Bucephala albeola
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Buffleheads' breeding habitat is small lakes and ponds in boreal forests with nearby stands of poplar and aspen. In the winter, they are most often found in coastal areas in shallow bays and inlets. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Common Goldeneye
Bucephala clangula
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Common Goldeneyes breed worldwide in northern boreal forests. They prefer clear water in small lakes and ponds that are not overwhelmed with submergent and emergent vegetation and which do not support populations of fish. Goldeneyes are cavity-nesting ducks and generally require forested habitat with mature trees (deciduous or coniferous) that offer suitable nesting cavities. During migration, goldeneyes stop on large lakes and rivers to feed while they move between breeding and wintering habitats. They winter primarily in marine areas, in shallow protected bays, estuaries, and large lakes with a sandy, gravel, or rocky substrate. They are occasionally found on sewage lagoons, and non-breeding birds sometimes summer in these areas. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Barrow's Goldeneye
Bucephala islandica
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The Barrow's Goldeneye is primarily a bird of the western mountain region of North America. It nests farther north than the Common Goldeneye, and in some cases even north of the tree line. The Barrow's Goldeneye prefers small, clear lakes and ponds that are not crowded with submergent and emergent vegetation and that do not support populations of fish. Goldeneyes are cavity-nesting ducks and typically use forested habitat with mature trees (deciduous or coniferous) that offer suitable nesting cavities. They have also been known to nest in other areas as well (see Nesting). During migration, goldeneyes stop to feed on large lakes and rivers. During winter they often frequent marine areas in shallow protected bays, estuaries, and large lakes with a sandy, gravel, or rocky substrate. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Hooded Merganser
Lophodytes cucullatus
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Small, forested, freshwater wetlands with emergent vegetation are the preferred breeding habitat of the Hooded Merganser. They have been known to breed in more open habitat when nest boxes are available. Low-elevation freshwater lakes, ponds, sloughs, and slow-moving rivers are all used. During migration, they visit a wider range of habitats, and are often found on open water, along river banks, and in coastal bays and tidal creeks. In winter, they are found in woodland ponds and swamps, as well as coastal estuaries, bays, and inlets. While they are found in brackish and salt water, they generally prefer fresh water. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Common Merganser
Mergus merganser
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Range-wide, Common Mergansers prefer fresh water in all seasons. They use deep, clear, forested lakes, reservoirs, and rivers for breeding. In winter, they occupy similar habitat, as well as bays, coastal estuaries, and harbors. They frequent salt-water habitats in Washington in the winter. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Red-breasted Merganser
Mergus serrator
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Breeding habitat is in the tundra and boreal-forest zones. Breeding occurs on fresh, brackish, and saltwater wetlands and in sheltered bays. During migration and in winter, Red-breasted Mergansers occur mostly on salt water, in coastal bays, estuaries, and other protected coastal areas. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Ruddy Duck
Oxyura jamaicensis
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In winter, Ruddy Ducks inhabit shallow, protected, saltwater bays and estuaries along the coast or ice-free, inland lakes and ponds. Breeding habitat is freshwater marshes and ponds with marshy borders mixed with open water. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Red-throated Loon
Gavia stellata
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Red-throated Loons nest in small ponds in the tundra near larger lakes or coastlines. In winter they spend most of their time on protected ocean bays and large estuaries, although they have been known to winter on large lakes as well. They can often be found foraging on submerged mudflats and are generally found in shallower, more protected water than other loons, usually within a mile of the coast. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Pacific Loon
Gavia pacifica
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Pacific Loons winter on the Pacific Coast, spending most of the winter on open water, farther from shore than other loon species. In summer, they nest on large, deep tundra lakes in the far north. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Common Loon
Gavia immer
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In the breeding season, Common Loons can be found on large secluded lakes (at least 49 acres in size) with plenty of room for takeoff, deep inlets and bays, and a good supply of small fish. These lakes can be in forested areas in mountains or lowlands. Islands, logs, and floating debris attract nesting loons. In winter, Common Loons are usually found on salt water, typically in shallow areas close to shore. They occasionally winter on fresh water. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Yellow-billed Loon
Gavia adamsii
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Found farther north than the Common Loon, Yellow-billed Loons nest on large lakes in the high arctic tundra. In the winter, they spend time on coastal waters in bays and inlets, and among island groups. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Pied-billed Grebe
Podilymbus podiceps
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During the breeding season, Pied-billed Grebes are found at low elevations in ponds, lakes, and marshes. Nesting areas typically have emergent vegetation to which these birds anchor their nests and open water in which they can forage. During the winter they are found on both fresh and salt water, although they are much more likely to be found on fresh water. More open water is used during winter, as the birds do not have nests to anchor at this time. Pied-billed Grebes often use areas near rivers, typically bodies of still water. In migration Pied-billed Grebes can be found at higher elevations, even in mountain lakes. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Horned Grebe
Podiceps auritus
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In winter Horned Grebes are usually found on salt water in coastal bays and exposed shores, and far less commonly on fresh water. During the nesting season they inhabit lakes with a mix of open water and wetland vegetation. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Red-necked Grebe
Podiceps grisegena
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Red-necked Grebes are found in distinctly different habitats at different times of year. During summer they nest on large freshwater lakes, sloughs, and reservoirs. They prefer areas with stable water levels and require emergent vegetation to anchor their floating nests. During winter they are found predominantly on salt water, most commonly in protected bays, marshes, and coasts. However in winter they can also be found miles offshore. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Eared Grebe
Podiceps nigricollis
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Eared Grebes breed in large freshwater lakes and reservoirs in eastern Washington in areas with open water and emergent vegetation. They are quick to take advantage of temporary or man-made bodies of water. During migration and throughout the winter, they are often found in high-saline lakes and certain coastal bays. Most of the population moves in winter to a few large hypersaline lakes in the West and Southwest (chiefly the Great Salt Lake and Mono Lake) to exploit the abundant brine shrimp and alkali flies that thrive in those waters. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Western Grebe
Aechmophorus occidentalis
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In winter Western Grebes are found mostly on saltwater bays. During the breeding season they are found on freshwater wetlands with a mix of open water and emergent vegetation. The breeding areas are located in the central arid steppe and Big Sage/Fescue zones stretching from California north and east to south-central Canada. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Clark's Grebe
Aechmophorus clarkii
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In winter Clark's Grebes are found mostly on saltwater bays. During the breeding season they prefer freshwater wetlands with a mix of open water and emergent vegetation. Breeding areas are located in the central arid steppe and Big Sage/Fescue zones that stretch from California north and east to south-central Canada. Clark's Grebes tend to forage farther from shore and in deeper water than Western Grebes. They are commonly found in mixed flocks with Western Grebes, but even in these flocks they tend to associate preferentially with other Clark's Grebes. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Northern Fulmar
Fulmarus glacialis
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Found in the cold waters of the open ocean, Northern Fulmars breed on steep sea cliffs on islands or mainland promontories. They use cliffs farther north than do most high-Arctic seabird species, often crossing ice-covered water to get to their breeding sites. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Sooty Shearwater
Puffinus griseus
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Sooty Shearwaters are widespread at sea and concentrate around upwellings, where cold and warm water masses meet, and over the continental shelf in cooler waters. They may come close to shore where the water is deep. They breed in the far Southern Hemisphere, on islands around Australia, New Zealand, and southern South America, where there is diggable soil for burrows, or rock crevices in which to situate nests. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image American White Pelican
Pelecanus erythrorhynchos
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American White Pelicans nest inland on isolated islands in lakes and rivers. They feed in shallow lakes, rivers, and marshes. During the winter, they are usually found in warm, coastal marine habitats such as protected bays and estuaries. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Brown Pelican
Pelecanus occidentalis
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The Brown Pelican is a coastal bird that is rarely found away from the sea. The birds on the Pacific Coast nest on islands off the coasts of southern California and Mexico. After the breeding season, they move north along the coast, frequenting shallow marine areas such as bays, offshore islands, spits, breakwaters, and open sandy beaches. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Brandt's Cormorant
Phalacrocorax penicillatus
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Almost always found on salt or brackish water, Brandt's Cormorants inhabit rocky shorelines and open ocean. Nesting colonies are typically located on slopes rather than cliff ledges, although some Washington colonies are located on steep cliffs. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Double-crested Cormorant
Phalacrocorax auritus
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Double-crested Cormorants are found on both coastal and inland waters. They often perch on rocks, sandbars, or pilings near fishing sites and forage at ponds, lakes, slow-moving rivers, estuaries, and open coastlines. Their breeding colonies are typically located on small rocky or sandy islands, or on the exposed tops of offshore rocks. They may also nest or roost in trees, especially when predators are present. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Pelagic Cormorant
Phalacrocorax pelagicus
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Exclusively marine, Pelagic Cormorants can be found in bays and sounds and on the coast (although usually fairly close to shore). They breed on small, offshore islands and rocky cliffs with deep water at the base. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Great Blue Heron
Ardea herodias
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Adaptable and widespread, the Great Blue Heron is found in a wide variety of habitats. When feeding, it is usually seen in slow-moving or calm salt, fresh, or brackish water. Great Blue Herons inhabit sheltered, shallow bays and inlets, sloughs, marshes, wet meadows, shores of lakes, and rivers. Nesting colonies are typically found in mature forests, on islands, or near mudflats, and do best when they are free of human disturbance and have foraging areas close by. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image American Coot
Fulica americana
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American Coots are common at lower elevations in large freshwater ponds, lakes, and slow-moving rivers. For nesting, they require tall marsh vegetation in shallow water. Other times of the year, they will occasionally visit salt marshes and protected coastal bays. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Red-necked Phalarope
Phalaropus lobatus
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Red-necked Phalaropes spend up to nine months at a time at sea. They nest in the low Arctic, on tundra ponds with marshy shores and bogs. They usually breed farther inland and at higher elevations than do Red Phalaropes, which prefer coastal breeding areas. During migration, large numbers gather at hyper-saline lakes before heading south. Many migrate over the open ocean, often within sight of land. Some migrate over land and can be seen on reservoirs, lakes, and coastal marshes. At sea, they gather at upwellings and convergence zones where food is brought to the surface. They are sometimes blown onshore by storms and during these times can be found anywhere, especially at sewage ponds. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Franklin's Gull
Larus pipixcan
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The Franklin's Gull is a common nesting gull of the northern Great Plains, nesting in extensive prairie marshes. Since the condition of these marshes is variable from year to year, it is not unusual for entire colonies to shift location annually. In winter, Franklin's Gulls leave North America for more southern coastal regions, concentrating in protected bays and estuaries. Winter habitat also includes agricultural fields, inland lakes, and offshore waters. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Bonaparte's Gull
Larus philadelphia
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Bonaparte's Gulls breed at the edge of the northern forest in areas with coniferous trees adjacent to lakes, marshes, or bogs. During migration and in winter, they frequent bodies of water, including rivers, lakes, sewage ponds, estuaries, and open ocean. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Heermann's Gull
Larus heermanni
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A Pacific species, the Heerman's Gull nests in western Mexico, and spends the non-breeding season in marine areas. A variety of coastal habitats, including rocky shores, bays, small offshore islands, kelp beds, sandy beaches, and estuaries, are all potential roosting sites. They seldom spend time at garbage dumps or on fresh water. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Mew Gull
Larus canus
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In winter, the Mew Gull inhabits coastal waters, and is commonly found in estuaries, river mouths, and freshwater ponds close to the shore. Summer habitat is concentrated around northern lakes. This species is not common at garbage dumps in any season and is seldom found offshore. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Ring-billed Gull
Larus delawarensis
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Ring-billed Gulls are found in a wide variety of habitats and occur over much of inland North America. They are usually found near fresh or salt water, and take advantage of foraging opportunities in developed areas such as parking lots, restaurants, garbage dumps, and agricultural areas. They also inhabit more natural areas such as coasts and bays. They are rarely found far offshore. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image California Gull
Larus californicus
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The California Gull is an inland breeding bird but may be seen at any season in marine habitats. It is common far from land in late summer and fall. As a breeder, it can survive in habitats that are too harsh for Herring and Ring-billed Gulls. During the breeding season, California Gulls inhabit lakes, farms, and marshes. They typically nest on gravel islands in large rivers or lakes. In winter, they spend time in nearly every habitat found along the Pacific Coast. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Herring Gull
Larus argentatus
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Herring Gulls use a wide variety of habitats near water. They are common on beaches, mudflats, plowed fields, marshes, docks, commercial fishing areas, and garbage dumps. In the breeding season, they nest on islands. In winter, they are more strongly associated with salt water or open fresh water and are widely distributed along the coasts. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Thayer's Gull
Larus thayeri
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During the breeding season, Thayer's Gulls inhabit the Canadian high Arctic, nesting on rocky coastlines of islands. In winter, they can be found around bodies of water near the coast, including estuaries and protected bays. They also spend time far offshore, on freshwater ponds, and garbage dumps near the coast. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Western Gull
Larus occidentalis
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Western Gulls are found mostly near the coast, and also found regularly offshore. They are not typically found far inland. Many types of habitats are used, including estuaries, beaches, fields, garbage dumps, and city waterfronts. Nest sites are often located on rocky, sandy, or gravel islands, or inaccessible mainland cliffs. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Glaucous-winged Gull
Larus glaucescens
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Glaucous-winged Gulls are commonly found in bays and estuaries, and on beaches and rocky shorelines. They also frequent freshwater lakes, agricultural fields, cities, and garbage dumps in coastal areas. They are sometimes found far offshore, well out of sight of land, but are less common far inland. Nesting habitat is mainly low, flat islands, with sandy, rocky, or gravel substrates. Building roofs in cities along Puget Sound have also been used as nesting habitat. Nests within Puget Sound are usually located in human-altered habitats, while nests along the coast are typically in natural settings. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Sabine's Gull
Xema sabini
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Sabine's Gulls nest in the high Arctic in marshy tundra ponds close to the coast. Outside the breeding season, they spend most of their time at sea, out of sight of land. When at sea, they concentrate over the continental shelf or over upwellings of cold, nutrient-rich water. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Black-legged Kittiwake
Rissa tridactyla
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A pelagic gull, this kittiwake spends most of the year at sea. The Black-legged Kittiwakes gather in areas of upwellings, sometimes over the edge of the continental shelf. They can be found from the coast to over a hundred miles offshore. They breed on narrow cliff ledges in the far north. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Caspian Tern
Hydroprogne caspia
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Caspian Terns use fresh- and saltwater wetlands, especially estuaries, coastal bays, and beaches. They are not usually found on open ocean, but prefer protected waters. Nesting usually takes place on low sand or gravel islands with sparse vegetation. In Washington, the birds have shifted their preferred habitat from natural sites inland to coastal, human-altered sites (often islands made from dredged material). They have also shifted from nesting in small groups mixed with gulls to large colonies of only Caspian Terns. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Common Tern
Sterna hirundo
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Common Terns frequent lakes, rivers, oceans, bays, and beaches. During the summer, they use a wide range of coastal and inland aquatic breeding habitats, but most are found in lowlands, with undisturbed flat islands or beaches surrounded by shallow water. In winter, they are more restricted to warm water coastlines. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Arctic Tern
Sterna paradisaea
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The Arctic Tern nests on marshes, tundra lakes, and shorelines in the Arctic, and south on the East Coast to New England. From 1977 to 1995, Arctic Terns nested on gravel islands and parking lots in Everett (Snohomish County). During the non-breeding season, the Arctic Tern is highly pelagic, spending most of its time on the open ocean, far from land. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Pomarine Jaeger
Stercorarius pomarinus
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When they are not breeding, Pomarine Jaegers are highly pelagic. They winter in productive regions of tropical and subtropical oceans, and concentrate over upwellings and boundaries of currents. They may be seen around large fishing vessels where they steal food from other seabirds. Their Arctic breeding grounds are on low-lying, wet, coastal tundra. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Parasitic Jaeger
Stercorarius parasiticus
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During migration, Parasitic Jaegers are more often found near shore and in estuaries than other jaegers. They spend most of the year on the ocean within a few miles of land. They nest on Arctic tundra, often near a body of water. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Common Murre
Uria aalge
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Common Murres typically nest on wide, open ledges on rocky cliffs, although only small numbers in Washington nest on cliffs. Most colonies in this state are located on sea stacks and flat-topped islands that are partially vegetated or bare. They spend much of the time on the open ocean and in large bays. They are found closer to rocky shorelines during the breeding season, and farther offshore during the non-breeding season. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Pigeon Guillemot
Cepphus columba
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Pigeon Guillemots are found along rocky shores and inshore waters along the Pacific coast from Alaska to California. During the breeding season, they can be found on rocky islands and mainland cliffs that are protected from predators, as well as on a variety of man-made structures. In the water, they are usually close to rocky shorelines where the water is 30-90 feet deep. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Marbled Murrelet
Brachyramphus marmoratus
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In Washington, Marbled Murrelets inhabit calm, shallow, coastal waters and bays, but breed inland, up to 45 miles from shore, in mature, wet forest. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Ancient Murrelet
Synthliboramphus antiquus
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Ancient Murrelets spend most of the time on cold-water seas. They forage over the edge of the continental shelf, and also closer to shore, especially in areas where tidal currents bring food up to the surface. They nest on islands or inland in dense forests with thick moss but little underbrush. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Cassin's Auklet
Ptychoramphus aleuticus
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Cassin's Auklet is one of the most widespread alcids in the northern Pacific. During the breeding season, they come inland and nest on islands, although during this time many are still found far offshore. In the non-breeding season, they are found in the open ocean, at the outer edge of the continental shelf. They use any kind of island for nesting, as long as mammalian predators are absent. In Washington, they prefer islands with shrubby habitat and cliffs. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Rhinoceros Auklet
Cerorhinca monocerata
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Rhinoceros Auklets are found both in coastal habitats and far from land. They often feed close to shore, especially where tidal currents near islands create upwellings and concentrations of food. Flocks may over-night in protected bays and forage farther out to sea during the day. Nesting islands have grass, shrubs or trees, with enough soil for the birds to burrow. Nests are typically located on slopes from which the birds can take flight easily. Learn more on BirdWeb

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Bird Image Tufted Puffin
Fratercula cirrhata
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Tufted Puffins can be found in many coastal habitats adjacent to the Washington coast and elsewhere in the northern Pacific, with the exception of estuaries. They breed in colonies on islands with steep, grassy slopes or on cliff tops. Winter habitat is well offshore, in mid-ocean. Learn more on BirdWeb

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